Sunday, March 11, 2007

Commodity Data Center Design

I love going to conferences. I know many people get tired of them and can find them boring, but I am both an information junkie and a geek, so I like them. The Web 2.0 Expo, coming this April has a particular session that caught my eye. Commodity Data Center Design, with James Hamilton has an interesting summary.

"This talk describes a commoditized data center design using standard shipping containers as the core building block."

I still haven't changed my mind on the Sun Black Box product, but it was certainly interesting that this Microsoft Architect was pushing a shipping container design. For the sake of seeing it for myself I have signed up to see the Sun Black Box on their nationwide tour. I'll (of course) write about it here afterwards. Check out the full Web 2.0 session summary and conference information here. Although I can not go to this conference I would sure love to hear from anyone that is going to it!

3 comments:

chuck goolsbee said...

"it was certainly interesting that this Microsoft Architect was pushing a shipping container design."

Think about it. Anytime a competitor tries something new and innovative, Microsoft responds with a "me too!" Even if they don't actually have any plans to make anything of the sort. This way, if said innovation starts showing any real success, Microsoft can wade into the market as well, claiming that they've been involved since the beginning.

It explains every one of their successes, and even their attempts:

Word, Excel, Windows, Exchange, SQLserver, Windows Media, Zune, etc.

The only thing that I can recall that was actually developed as a new innovation within Microsoft from the very beginning was....



Bob™


And all that came of that was Melinda Gates.


--chuck

John Rath said...

Chuck,

Very....very true! I used to teach Lotus 123 spreadsheet and WordPerfect (long time ago). The history studies in the future will show exactly what you said -- they didn't invent the software, just marketed the heck out of it and pushed/forced it to the world.

What I was half way curious about is the fact that this guy was proclaiming the container model, but Microsoft is building the mega data center facilities as well. I'm struggling with the container model because it seems so radically different (perhaps 'wierd') than what we are used to. However, many great ideas have gone against the norm like this and later become revolutionary. This is why I signed up to go see the BlackBox.

-John
P.S.: Bob sucked :)

Isabel Wang said...

Hmm... looks like they've taken down that session description. A number of Live.com people left Microsoft recently. Could the intended speaker be on the way out too?